NOISE EXCLUSION IN VISUAL AND AUDITORY MODALITIES IN CHILDREN WITH LANGUAGE DISORDER

  • Stanislava Antonijević
  • Catriona Night
  • Gwendaline Dring
  • Deborah Lynch
  • Jemma Murphy
  • Martina Boyle
  • Mark A. Elliott

Abstract

In order to examine the contribution of noise exclusion ability to language impairment fourgroups of participants were compared: children with Specific Language Impairment (SLI),children with dyslexia, children with Downs Syndrome (DS) and typically developing children(TD). With the aim of establishing whether noise exclusion is modality specific both visualand auditory modalities were tested – in the visual modality noise exclusion was tested usingan apparent motion paradigm while in the auditory modality a spoken word identificationtask was employed. Analysis revealed that in the visual modality all participants performedequally well in high and low noise conditions. However, children with dyslexia were overallless accurate in identifying motion direction. In the auditory task only children with DSshowed difficulties with noise exclusion, although children with SLI were overall lessaccurate then children with dyslexia and TD children. This leads us to the conclusion thatnoise exclusion deficits are not a necessary condition for language impairment, and that theyare, at least partly, modality specific processes.
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