EFFECT OF THE SPACE BETWEEN TACTILE STIMULI MARKING EMPTY TIME INTERVALS ON DURATION CATEGORIZATION

  • Simon Grondin
  • Tsuyoshi Kuroda
  • Takako Mitsudo

Abstract

The aim of this study was to measure the impact of the distance between tactile stimuli marking brief time intervals on threshold estimates and perceived duration. Each interval to be categorized as short or long was marked by two brief signals (mid-value = 500 ms) delivered on participants' left (L) or right (R) hand: L-L, R-R, L-R, or R-L. The hands were placed close to one other or at a distance of 3 feet. Eight-point individual psychometric functions were drawn for each of the eight experimental conditions. The results reveal that marking intervals with signals delivered at the same location results in better temporal discrimination than with one signal delivered on each hand. Moreover, intervals are perceived as longer when they are marked with signals delivered on different hands than with signals delivered on the same hand. For both threshold and perceived duration, no difference was observed between signals received on the left or the right hand or between the L-R and R-L sequence. Finally, the distance between hands did not affect the pattern of results. The results with perceived duration are consistent with the kappa effect but not with an attentional account of duration discrimination.
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